Nigerians who pay ransom to kidnappers could face a 15-year prison sentence, according to the Senate

Nigerians who pay ransom to kidnappers and kidnappers who collect ransom face 15 years in prison, according to the bill.
The Nigerian Senate has introduced a bill that would make it illegal to pay a ransom for the release of someone who has been kidnapped, incarcerated, or wrongfully detained.
Nigerians who pay ransom to kidnappers and kidnappers who collect ransom face 15 years in prison, according to the bill.
Senator Ezenwa Francis Onyewuchi is the author of the Terrorism Prevention (Amendment) Bill, 2021, which received second reading during plenary.
Senator Ezenwa Francis Onyewuchi is the author of the Terrorism Prevention (Amendment) Bill, 2021, which received second reading during plenary.
The lawmaker who led debate on the bill stated that it aims to amend the Terrorism (Prevention) Act, 2013 to make it illegal to pay ransom to abductors, kidnappers, or terrorists in exchange for the release of someone who has been wrongfully confined, imprisoned, or kidnapped.
According to Onyewuchi, the bill aims to replace section 14 of the Principal Act with a new section that reads:
“Anyone who transfers money, makes a bribe, or conspires with an abductor, kidnapper, or terrorist to collect every ransom for the release of any person who has been wrongfully confined, incarcerated, or kidnapped is guilty of a crime and faces a sentence of not less than one year in prison if convicted.
He expressed concern that kidnapping has turned into a lucrative and fast market, noting that “it has now remained the most virulent form of banditry in Nigeria, as well as the most widespread and intractable violent crime in the country.”
Details will be given later…

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