Neco visual arts answers 2021

NECO VISUAL ART ESSAY ANSWERS 2021

Here is the neco visual arts essay answers 2021, remember to subscribe for waec answers.

(6a)

The term “Applied art” refers to the application (and resulting product) of artistic design to utilitarian objects in everyday use. Whereas works of fine art have no function other than providing aesthetic or intellectual stimulation to the viewer, works of applied art are usually functional objects which have been “prettified” or creatively designed with both aesthetics and function in mind. Applied art embraces a huge range of products and items, from a teapot or chair, to the walls and roof of a railway station or concert hall, a fountain pen or computer mouse.

(6b)

i. Furniture.

ii. Carpets.

iii.Tapestry

iii. Embroidery.

iv. Batik.

v. Jewellery.

vi. Orecious metalwork.

vii. Pottery.

viii. Goldsmithing.

(6c)

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(1)
(i)Crochet, craft that developed in the 19th century out of a form of chain-stitch embroidery done with a hook instead of a needle. In crochet work the hook is used, without a foundation material, to make a texture of looped and interlinked chains of thread.

(ii)A hue is the actual color of something, such as naphthol red, sap green, or ultramarine, or any name we give a pigment or combination of pigments. Essentially, a hue is what we more often refer to as color, though hue is more technically correct.

(iii)kiln is a special kind of oven for firing things like pottery and bricks. A ceramic artist might use a kiln once a week to fire the bowls he’s made from clay, Making mugs and bowls is the primary use of kilns, but there are some that dry lumber, tobacco leaves, or hops as well.

(iv)A maquette is model for a larger piece of sculpture, created in order to visualise how it might look and to work out approaches and materials for how it might be made. Hubert Dalwood.

(v)A viewfinder is a tool that enables artists to frame or crop a particular scene to arrange their composition. It is usually a square or a rectangle made out of card or plastic through which you look at an area in more detail.
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(2a)
Mummification is the process of preserving the body after death by deliberately drying or embalming flesh. It was once a widespread practice among many ancient societies.
(2b)
(i)Rules of Painting: Egyptian civilization was highly religious. Thus most Egyptian artworks involve the depiction of many gods and goddesses – of whom the Pharaoh was one. In addition, the Egyptian respect for order and conservative values led to the establishment of complex rules for how both Gods and humans could be represented by artists.
(ii)Use of Pigments: The use of colour in Egyptian paintings was also regulated and used symbolically. Egyptian artists used six colours in their paintings red, green, blue, yellow, white and black. Red, being the colour of power, symbolized life and victory, as well as anger and fire. Green symbolized new life, growth, and fertility, while blue symbolized creation and rebirth, and yellow symbolized the eternal, such as the qualities of the sun and gold.
(iii)Egyptian Arts And The Afterlife: Nearly all of Ancient Egypt’s surviving paintings were discovered in tombs of the pharaohs or high governmental officials, and portrays scenes of the afterlife. Known as funerary art, these pictures depicted the narrative of life after death as well as things like servants, boats and food to help the deceased in their trip through the after life.
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(5a) -(Choose any 5)-
i. Nok
ii.Benin
iii.Ife
iv.Igbo Ukwu
v.Tsoede
vi.Ibibio
vii.Mbari
viii.Ikom monolith.
(5b)
Nok Art: Nok refers to the culture associated with a one hundred square kilometer area in central Nigeria where thousands of terracotta figures were found. These figures were first encountered in tin mines by Colonel J. Dent Young in 1928 and were classified as Nok by Bernard Fagg in 1943. Dates associated with Nok were recently categorized into three periods: Early Nok beginning in the middle of the second millennium B.C.E., Middle Nok (900 to 300 B.C.E.), and Late Nok (1500 B.C.E. to the turn of the Common Era) (Franke and Breunig 2014). The majority of objects found at Nok are dated to the Middle period. Nigerian National Commission for Museums and Monuments, National Museum in Jos, the National Museum in Kaduma, and National Museum in Lagos all have collections of Nok artifacts. Outside of Nigeria, the Yale University Art Gallery has a collection of Nok objects that was acquired in the 1950s and 1960s by Bayard Rustin, known civil rights activist.
Nok figure sculptures are easily distinguishable by their large heads and facial features. Complete figurines range in size from 300 millimeters to one meter (approximately eleven inches to three feet). Scholars contest that these figures likely depict important political people or ancestors based on the fact that they wear prestigious forms of decoration (Fagg and Lamp 2014). The eyes are D-shaped with perforated pupils and are delineated with simple lines. Eyebrows appear as curved lines or with a slight arch. Ears are placed in perfunctory positions such as the back of the head or at the angle of the jaw. Mouths protrude outwards, are pierced in the center, and sometimes lips are parted. Noses are broad and feature nostrils that are portrayed as holes pierced through the clay. There is a wide variety of hairstyles including “buns, tiers, cones, braids, topknots, ringlets, and tassels” (Fagg and Lamp 2014). Frank Willett argues that there was a decline of Nok style as evidenced by the less naturalistic seated man sculpture as found at the National Museum in Kaduna (Willett 1980). This figure is more simplified with pierced eyes without the D-shaped outlining and eyebrows, its nose is portrayed with two pierced holes and does not have a defined shape, and its mouth is a gaping hole without pronounced lips. The face lacks the sophistication in style of previous Nok terracotta figures.
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(6a)
The term “Applied art” refers to the application (and resulting product) of artistic design to utilitarian objects in everyday use. Whereas works of fine art have no function other than providing aesthetic or intellectual stimulation to the viewer, works of applied art are usually functional objects which have been “prettified” or creatively designed with both aesthetics and function in mind. Applied art embraces a huge range of products and items, from a teapot or chair, to the walls and roof of a railway station or concert hall, a fountain pen or computer mouse.

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(6b)
i. Furniture.
ii. Carpets.
iii.Tapestry
iii. Embroidery.
iv. Batik.
v. Jewellery.
vi. Orecious metalwork.
vii. Pottery.
viii. Goldsmithing.

(6c)
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Aina Onabolu: Born on 13 September 1882 in Ijebu-Ode, Aina Onabolu was the pioneer of Nigerian Modern Art. He occasioned a radical revolution that facilitated the inclusion of arts scholarship into the curriculum of colonial Nigeria in the 1920s. As a self-taught artist, Onabolu developed his drawing and painting skills through pictures gleaned from European textbooks and magazines that were available to him in the early 20th century, when formal art training was not yet available in Nigeria. Although he became an accomplished artist, Onabolu’s greatest influence was in teaching art; after obtaining a diploma in fine arts from European art schools, he returned to Nigeria to promote the fine arts through education and policy reform. As a teacher, Onabolu sought to make his students understand the technical aspects of art. He emphasized the sciences of perspective, proportion, color technology, and chiaroscuro, encouraging students to take courses like drawing, basic design, and painting, and thus earning him the title Mr. Perspective around Lagos, as well as a reputation that would later mark him as the Father of Modern Nigerian Art.
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